refusing induction?

Discussion in 'Labour & Birth' started by sammielou, Apr 16, 2016.

  1. sammielou

    sammielou Well-Known Member

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    I'm 34 weeks, and I may change my mind, but having been told all about the methods and timescales of induction that my chosen hospital use - my feeling is that I'm going to refuse them all. Unless they directly tell me that either me or my baby is at risk if I don't labour immediately.

    So, ladies, how many of you go along with the flow of induction - whatever it may be where you are - and how many dig their heals in and succesfully wait for natural labour to start even if you go 12+ days beyond due date?

    I really really hope I'm wasting my time thinking about this and that baby comes naturally on schedule, but honestly - induction just feels wrong to me at this point. Before anyone says it - I accept that come my due date I may be totally sick of pregnancy and be ready for this baby to be out. I just want to think about it well ahead of time so that I've got my feelings and facts straight should it come to this.
     
  2. Birdie

    Birdie Well-Known Member

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    In France you are only overdue after 43 weeks.... that's how arbitrary the whole due date thing is in my opinion. From my research I believe that far too many medically unnecessary inductions are carried out in the UK, leading to huge rates of emergency interventions. I think women are routinely misled using general statistics & scare tactics instead of solid facts about the risk (or lack thereof) to their own pregnancy.

    I would refuse induction for anything other than an imminent & serious risk to my baby. I personally would not worry about being 12 days over unless it flagged a serious medical issue.

    ETA: this is my 2nd pregnancy
     
    #2 Birdie, Apr 16, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  3. Jojo84

    Jojo84 Well-Known Member

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    personally i wouldn't refuse induction... they don/t do it for fun and i would always prefer to air on the side of caution. to me baby getting her safely is the most important thing and inductions arent nice (ive had one) but i dont care as long as baby is safely here.
     
  4. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    I think it depends on the reason for induction. Obviously there are valid medical reasons but i am wary of routine induction. Where I live it is routine to induce at 41 weeks. The medical evidence for this is scetchy and it seems a bit silly that it varies so much between different countries and different hospitals. I was also told i would need an early induction because the baby was big, which is a very outdated idea. There is also a very high rate of CS and episiotomy where I live. I chose to wait until i went into labour naturally at 41+3. I was able to have a natural unmediated home birth and feel it was the best and safest option for me and the baby. If i had gone to 42 weeks I would have considered induction. Waiting can hold risks but every intervention holds risks too. Induction often leads to more interventions. I think it is a case of educating yourself and deciding what you are most comfortable with. Doctors and MWs are dealing with large numbers of women and induction can be an easy option for them. Waiting means doing more scans, tests and appoints which is expensive and takes time, its not always based on the very best choice for an individual. Its not uncommon for a woman to be told she has to be induced only to show up at the hospital and then be sent home again because they are too busy, so obviously the induction wasnt that important to start with. My aunt had an early induction because her doctor was goinv on holiday , lol, but that was in the US.
     
    #4 BunnyN, Apr 16, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  5. CharlieSmartie

    CharlieSmartie Well-Known Member

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    I wish I had refused induction with my daughter. It was horrendous and after 42 hours of contractions still ended up in c-section. I didn't know you could refuse it.

    But I absolutely will definitely refuse it next time without a doubt
     
  6. sammielou

    sammielou Well-Known Member

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    When they went through this at the antenatal class last week they very quietly, in on offhand and mumbling way, said 'if you chose not to go this route, then you'll be monitored closely and advised.' I take that to mean that if I do refuse, I'm going to be met with frequent pressure to change my mind.

    My sister was born 17 days over her 'due date' 26 years ago, and by that point my Mum was begging them to induce her and they flat out refused and made her wait for natural labour. Funny how things change.

    I agree with Birdie - the fact that they set out this schedule for every 'normal' pregnancy at my labour ward sets off alarm bells for me. We're all different, induction should be based upon us and our baby and how things are going for the individual pregnancy. They clearly don't have the science to do that (or can't afford the resources), so they lump us all in on their decided schedule.

    I'll hang on to my hope that baby will come 'on time' and I won't have a battle on my hands (both with my conscience - because part of my agrees with jojo48 about them not doing it for fun - and with the midwives who like their timetables).
     
  7. russellmuscle

    russellmuscle Well-Known Member

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    Jackson was born 14 days after his due date. After 2 failed sweeps, sex, curries, walks, house decorating Lmao he didn't budge.

    I loved every minute of my labour. It was only 7hr from first contractions. My waters went themself and I didn't need the drip. He was born just under 2hr from my waters going at 5cm.

    I actually loved my labour so much I almost want a redo this time. So much scares me going into labour at home lol. Everyone is different and I know a lot of inductions have went way worse than mine so wouldn't preach them for everyone.

    I do often think the reason my induction went so well is because how overdue I was. I don't think I'd like an induction early or anything. However if I go overdue this time I welcome it.

    I felt so incontrol and safe at my induction. I knew the exact stage I was at and had pain relief there.

    Despite Jackson being 2weeks over he was 7lb 3oz so not huge.

    xxxx
     
  8. Browneyed Girl

    Browneyed Girl Well-Known Member

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    The UK has a terrible still birth record with 5000 deaths a year - our record is worse than some third world countries! I think the NHS is under considerable pressure to reduce this figure understandably. There is a pilot ongoing at the moment to try and reduce this with extra scans when reduced movement is reported etc. I think this is why they are keen on induction at certain stages, as someone else has said they don't have the capacity or money to assess everyone individually in detail so there has to be blanket guidelines. I was offered induction at 37 weeks due to reduced movement and being an ivf pregnancy which is higher risk, it was offered as a choice and I could refuse or wait until later and while they made it clear it was my choice there was a definite understanding that risks shouldn't be taken. I was induced and my lo was born at 38 weeks. If I had the choice again I'd do the same because the thought of refusing induction and then something going wrong was not something I wanted to contemplate. I completely understand that in most cases everything is fine and it's down to the mum involved but there are good reasons why induction is offered routinely and I don't think it's just to minimise monitoring xx


     
  9. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    If you read information from the NHS about deciding polocies about when to induce they are pretty open about the fact that the cost of extra monitoring is a large factor.

    The US has a high induction rate and one of the worst neonatal death rates in the developed world. Of course it doesnt mean that induction is directly to blame but it does show that a more medicalised aproach to birth is not always synonymous with lower risks.

    Dont get me wrong. I totally respect if someone else makes an informed decision to go ahead with induction. I'm not trying to argue with those who decide induction is the safest choice for them. I would accept induction myself under certain cicumstances. I just think its a choice that is not that simple and there can be good reasons for those that decide to refuse. Refusing induction doesnt automatically mean that a women crazy or that she is thoughtlesly putting her child at risk for selfish reasons, which is sometimes how you are treated. We all are just trying to make the best choices to keep us and bubs safe.
     
    #9 BunnyN, Apr 17, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2016
  10. Browneyed Girl

    Browneyed Girl Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely agree, it's not an easy choice and top priority should always be safety of mum and baby x


     
  11. daisyduke76

    daisyduke76 Well-Known Member

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    With my first baby, they wanted to induce me at 41+4. I had spoken to my midwife, and we had decided that as baby and I were healthy, I would refuse that first induction. I went to the appointment, and the monitored me for an hour or two, and then told me I could have a couple more days. I was booked in at 41+6 but thankfully I went into labour naturally that morning.

    There were a number of reasons I refused an induction, but I feel like I would have gone along with it the second time. I do understand the risks, but I also think that most babies come when they're ready. Unless there's a danger to me or the baby, I think I will do the same again this time.

    I met a woman at a positive birth group last week who was 3 weeks late. I do understand the risks, but as someone else said other countries count pregnancies differently.

    I think ultimately you have to do what feels right for you and your family. It's not an easy choice. xx
     
  12. Maud

    Maud Well-Known Member

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    I won't accept an induction if offered. I find it very strange how keen that are to get baby out as soon as you hit the EDD, despite 'on time' being a good 4 week window. I was shocked when my MW told me last time I'd be offered a sweep as soon as I hit 40 weeks; I certainly didnt want one! If they can show a medical reason for it, rather than just having reached an arbitrary date it would be different.
     
    #12 Maud, Apr 18, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
  13. russellmuscle

    russellmuscle Well-Known Member

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    Jesus, as much as Id like to go over - 2 weeks was enough.

    I couldnt have managed another week!! I could barely move.

    Although size wise, I couldve handled it - problem is they cant always be sure of size/weight. Jackson was suppoesed to be a tiny baby, he was measuring 5 weeks behind and was 7lb 3oz.

    xxxx
     
  14. KeelyT90

    KeelyT90 Well-Known Member

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    I have to be induced early as I cannot carry full term due to health reasons. Last labour I was induced at 38 weeks and it was painful. MW advised that induced labour is more painful than a natural labour as your body is not producing the labour hormone which acts as a natural pain relief so I totally understand why people would want to do go naturally.

    However, as I have hypermobility syndrome, I am advised that labour is alot more intense & rapid labour. I found out the hard way after not having a single break between any of my contractions and contracted for 2 hours from waters breaking to time of birth. So I am in a lose lose situation here lol xx
     
  15. russellmuscle

    russellmuscle Well-Known Member

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    I was the same until he came, I was contracting on top of one another, but after my waters went it stopped oddly.

    I wonder if thats because my waters went and I dilated myself that my body kinda went semi natural :lol:

    But yeah I imagine it would be sorer as its basically forced labour. Ouch.

    xxxx
     
  16. KeelyT90

    KeelyT90 Well-Known Member

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    My bump also stopped growing at 32 weeks & had growth scant every fortnight until the end, but, considering I went 2 weeks early I had a 6lb 10.5oz Crazy how different things turn out xx
     
  17. glowing

    glowing Well-Known Member

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    Our trust offer post date induction at 40 + 12 but policy is 40 + 14 as upper limit as per nice guidelines. After this if a woman is refusing induction a scan is offered at 40 +15 and daily monitoring until labour starts. The concern is the maturing placenta can start to fail to feed the baby it's essential blood. They also offer sweeps at 40 + 5 for first time mums and 40 + 7 for mums who have had babies before. I wouldn't refuse an induction as a stillbirth is not worth the risk of waiting. Earlier induction is offered if medically warranted such as pre - eclampsia, reduced movements, no growth, cord not flowing correctly etc etc.
     
  18. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    I would consider an induction at 40+14 because that is when the risk of still birth increases slightly. But where I live induction at 40+7 is the norm. Average for a first time mum going into labour naturally is 40+5 so a lot of first time mums are automatically induced. Being offered an induction at 40+12 seems more reasonable but there are still risks to induction as well as to waiting so I can understand why some mums would choose to wait longer.
     
    #18 BunnyN, Apr 19, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016
  19. Aes1990

    Aes1990 Well-Known Member

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    I went into labour with DD1 40+11 after 2 sweeps and had her the morning I should have been induced. I would have gone through with induction no doubt. She had already pooped inside and my placenta was going black when it passed. That's enough for me to know that they know best and if I go over this time i will fully follow what they tell me


     
  20. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    I had never heard of a placenta turning black before. Did they give any explication? I know an overly mature placenta gets white gritty looking areas on it.
     
    #20 BunnyN, Apr 19, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016

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