Horse-riding foof?

Discussion in 'Third Trimester' started by Warley, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. Warley

    Warley Well-Known Member

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    Hiya

    Just wondering everyone keeps saying that if they ride horses then the midwife can tell, but no one ever says how they can tell and also what does this mean when you give birth?

    CarleyX
     
  2. monster_munch

    monster_munch Well-Known Member

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    My midwives never mentinoned that to me when I had my daughter :think:

    I know we're supposed to have stronger pelvic floor muscles as riding tones them, so maybe it feels tighter/stronger when the m/w examines you or something?

    I've noticed this time round, as I haven't ridden properly for along time, I'm actually having to do my pelvic floor exercises, whereas with my first they were already really strong, so maybe it is true?
     
  3. kellysomer

    kellysomer Well-Known Member

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    LOL i am sure that the only time the MW would tell is if you had hugely over developed pelvic floor muscles which you use when riding, but you'd have to be an endurance rider for that i would have thought. I never had any comments about my 'foof' :rotfl: during pregnancy or labour.

    I think my muscles were toned in that area from riding so everything was tighter in labour, it certainly didnt help me although as a 1st labour i dont have a great deal to compare it to. I will let you know in about 6 weeks as i havent ridden much in the last year compared to last time.
     
  4. paradysso

    paradysso Well-Known Member

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    i was wondering the same :think:
     
  5. Fingers crossed

    Fingers crossed Well-Known Member

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    Maybe horseriders foofs are in the shape of a saddle :think:
     
  6. paradysso

    paradysso Well-Known Member

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  7. Natural mamma

    Natural mamma Well-Known Member

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    I have a horse and its never been mentioned to me...apart form the fact the midwife was not surprised i suffer with SPD as riding widens your pelvis :shock:
     
  8. KJL

    KJL Well-Known Member

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    I ride regularly and compete regularly (obviously not at the mo :lol: ) and was told that regular riders tend to have stronger pelvic floor muscles and they can see this when they examine you.
     
  9. paradysso

    paradysso Well-Known Member

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    does havng stronger pelvic floor make labour any more difficult?
     
  10. KJL

    KJL Well-Known Member

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    I have heard it can if they are extremely strong it may slow down labour slightly but I think this is only if they are very strong. Good pelvic floors can help facilitate labour though.
     
  11. Sally+Baby

    Sally+Baby Well-Known Member

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    How do they know you haven't been riding something else? :rotfl:
     
  12. mayday

    mayday Well-Known Member

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    My baby couldn't get out due to over strong pelvic floor, my riding instructor friend had serious difficulty getting both of her's out, and a work colleagues wife (who is a horse vet) had her baby come out like a ping pong ball out of a thai stripper! That was the husband's description anyway :shock:
     

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