Epidural

Discussion in 'Third Trimester' started by MariaIsabella, May 18, 2016.

  1. MariaIsabella

    MariaIsabella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    944
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wanted to hear everyone's thoughts on this. I always new I wanted one since that is what most of my friends and family had when they went through labor. Most of my family and friends come from Sweden where its standard and normal to offer this and Sweden has a higher safety record when it comes to child birth than UK ( quite a bit I think ).

    When I asked my midwife here in the UK they managed to scare me a little and said it could be risky etc etc so I started to doubt myself. But then I spoke to a friend of mine who is mw and she told me on NHS they are told to push everyone to go natural and scare patients a bit so most end up without epidural. My mw friend said she had 3 children all with epidural since its why go through that kind of pain when you don't have to?

    For me its a no brainer but what are your thoughts on this? :)
     
  2. fcroxy

    fcroxy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    Messages:
    1,490
    Likes Received:
    0
    I personally didn't want an epidural with my first as I didn't like the idea of not being able to move around or feel my legs in labour, also really didn't want to have a catheter after the birth, small risk of infection etc. I had also opted for the 6 hour discharge and having an epidural can make you stay longer as you gotta wait until its worn off and are able to use the toilet and move around. Saying all that I did give birth without one but I had to have one after the birth as I had a third degree tear and needed stitches. This time I plan on not having an epidural again for the birth but who knows when it comes to it.

    If you want one then I would just tell your midwife that's what you wish for and put it in your birth notes and make your birthing partner aware. Xx
     
  3. flexilexi394

    flexilexi394 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2010
    Messages:
    7,045
    Likes Received:
    5
    I was very open minded with my first baby... And by the time I begged the midwife for an epidural I was 10 cm and pushing otherwise I would have had one.

    I had one AFTER my daughter was born because I tore so much they gave me an epidural to go into surgery to be stitched back up!

    This time around I think I'll be able to manage without an epidural... I want to try for a water birth or at least an active birth.

    As far as I know, they will give you an epidural if you want it, it's readily available at the hospitals in the UK so there's no reason why they won't give you one. They have to go through all the risks because they can go wrong and of course the NHS are always slated for one reason or the other so they have to give you every risk and warning there is possible before proceeding x
     
  4. Jojo84

    Jojo84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    10,721
    Likes Received:
    1
    My epidural was great lol I was going to donor without but had such awful back spasms I had to have one. I would see how you feel and explore other options first before automatically going for one
     
  5. KeelyT90

    KeelyT90 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2014
    Messages:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    0
    It is hopefully one of my options, however, as I have hypermobility, It is known that HMS suffers are resistant to pain relief and I know I have had to have a double dose of dental blocks for tooth extractions/fillings etc. Something I will discuss with the consultant anyway. My last labour was so exhausting and intense, I didn't have a break between my contactions for 4 hours. I cannot do that again lol it is hard to remain calm when you're exhaisted in agony. Plus, I was bed ridden anyway being hooked up to those belts! x
     
    #5 KeelyT90, May 18, 2016
    Last edited: May 18, 2016
  6. Maud

    Maud Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,728
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would hate to birth with an epidural as it means lying on your back and more intervention. I birthed on all fours last time. Sadly I had to have a epidural afterwards due to a tear and it meant being stuck in bed with a catheter for the day after which was miserable. Everyone's different though and I can see the benefit of an epidural for people having really long labours (my last was super quick so no time for any pain relief!)
     
  7. fluffycat

    fluffycat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2014
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    I too was quite open minded with my first baby. I didn't want to have an epidural if I could manage and cope with the pain myself. Having said that, I never actually made it last 2cm dilation myself as baby was back to back and I was in the worst pain of my life!! begged for the epidural and it was the best thing ever, took all pain away and I could relax while they broke my waters and have me the drip to quicken labour for me.
    Am due my 2nd baby in 6 weeks and will definately be having the epidural. For me there is no point being in pain when u have the option of pain relief xx
     
  8. MariaIsabella

    MariaIsabella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    944
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks ladies, good with a lot of different opinions! I have done a lot of research and spoken to many people that have experienced both and come to the conclusion Epidural is definitely for me. Spoke to my mother as well and she said I should definitely go for epidural as it was wonderful not to feel that pain. She had epidural with me ( first baby ) and was great but did not have time for one with my sister so she experienced both.

    I just hope it will be available when I need it! xx :)
     
  9. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    5,310
    Likes Received:
    2
    I prefer not to have an epidural. It is important to me to be able to walk and move around freely in labour. I coped with the pain as long as I could do that. I was surprised how much I actually enjoyed labour. Of course its painful but there is also a huge rush of endorphins and adrenaline going on. I loved pushing and liked being able to feel what was going on as baby's head and then body was born. It would make me a bit sad to miss all that.

    Epidurals do lead to a higher rate of interventions. I'd rather endure the pain of labour than be stuck with an episiotomy wound that took weeks to heal while I was looking after my newborn. It was also wonderful to be on my feet and taking a shower, and going to the toilet myself etc shortly after the birth.

    The worst side effects of an epidural are not that common but can happen, including killer headaches and in rare cases spinal damage. As with any drug during labour some will pass to the baby. Epidurals are not as bad for this as some drugs but they do contain a pretty strong cocktail of meds so I'd prefer to avoid exposing baby to that if possible. I do think epidurals have there place though. I understand why some ladies prefer them and I would have one myself under some circumstances, it just wouldnt be a first choice for me.
     
  10. MariaIsabella

    MariaIsabella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    944
    Likes Received:
    0
    Epidurals have been done for ages and as I mentioned midwifes are pushed to recommend other options and "scare" you into not having it. I am not buying all they say about risks etc. since everyone I know have them and in Sweden its very common and trust the care there. You are even free to choose a c section in Sweden if you prefer.

    Either way, I can see your point about missing out the feeling of baby coming out etc but for me this is an easy choice.

    xx
     
  11. Tigger87

    Tigger87 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2012
    Messages:
    3,392
    Likes Received:
    0
    I really don't think it's fair to suggest midwives are ever told to scare you into anything. They work on evidence based research, and use that to advise women of the best methods. The risks associated with epidural are just that - risks. They're not a definite, and I would never personally rule out having one, but it's my intention to minimise the risks to my recovery by not having one. The same with caesarean. As soon as the benefits outweigh the risks (and in the case of epidural this could easily be me not coping with the pain, I was begging for one at 10cm first time! But too late!) I will go ahead. I feel quite strongly about the use of language describing midwives - you really need to trust your health care provider. They are there to act within your interests, and the best outcome for you. They advise based on evidence, not to push any cost savings etc.
     
  12. Nickinakinoo

    Nickinakinoo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2015
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    4
    Sorry hijacking your thread, if you tear do you have to have an epidural? Are there no alternatives?
     
  13. Tigger87

    Tigger87 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2012
    Messages:
    3,392
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think generally Nickinakinoo it's when you have a serious tear, so usually 3rd degree (ie into your back passage). I had a 2nd degree year and they stitched in the delivery room with local anaesthetic!
     
  14. KeelyT90

    KeelyT90 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2014
    Messages:
    1,131
    Likes Received:
    0
    I had second degree and had local anaes.... x
     
  15. Maud

    Maud Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,728
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes, epidurals are only needed for 3rd degree and up. Small tears can be done there and then by midwife.
     
  16. Nickinakinoo

    Nickinakinoo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2015
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    4
    Nope nope nope, I'd rather they just knock me out! Epidural is a complete no go for me!
     
  17. MariaIsabella

    MariaIsabella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    944
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am going after what midwifes has told me directly, basically saying "I am not supposed to tell you this but we are told to always push for no epidurals but I myself has had 3 births and went against what I tell my patients and had epidurals on all 3 since I know its the most comfortable option by far" etc. I am not trying to offend you in any way and sorry if I did? :hugs:

    I do believe cost is an issue in the UK since you have so many people to care for which is natural. Comparing to my example, Sweden which has less people, Epidurals are seen very differently and more of a standard I would say. Sweden also go for C sections much quicker than in the UK instead of prolonging something inevitable etc. and has better safety stats when it comes to child birth than UK. there are risks with Epidurals like everything but there are also risks going without if this will stress you.

    Anyhow, everyone is entitled to their own opinion and only interested in hearing all your thoughts :)

    x
     
  18. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    5,310
    Likes Received:
    2
    I think there is a difference between stating the facts about risks which is imprtant for women know so that they can make an informed decision, and scaremongering. It only makes sense that MWs are instructed to encourage you to consider the lowest risk options first but should also feel free to make their own choices. I'm sure there are some MWs that dont get the balance right.

    The US also has a high epidural and CS rate and has some of the worst statistics in the developed world so I think there are many factors involed. By the way by law any woman is entitled to a CS in the UK.
     
  19. MariaIsabella

    MariaIsabella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2014
    Messages:
    944
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yes, but you have to pay if you want c section in the UK right? I definitely don't want that option though unless necessary.

    I am sure there is a difference between how mw act etc. and of course they should be honest but I only go after what I have heard and read and my own opinion is the risks can be a bit exaggerated ( I am no doctor so I don't know but this is what I feel after doing my research ). Either way, lets agree to disagree ;)

    xx
     
  20. fcroxy

    fcroxy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2013
    Messages:
    1,490
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unfortunately for me I got told I had to have one when I had a third degree tear, I needed stitches in surgery. I begged them to put me to sleep rather than an epidural as I really didn't want one, especially as I had managed labour without one! But I was told an epidural was the safest option and they don't like putting ladies to sleep after giving birth as its not safe, I cant remember why I was a bit out of it on gas and air lol xx
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice