I have had quite a bit of fish this week and now deeply worried

Discussion in 'First Trimester' started by baby2012lp, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. baby2012lp

    baby2012lp Well-Known Member

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    Hello Girls

    I have eaten quite a bit of fish this week
    Sunday Cod
    Monday Salmon fishcake
    Thursday Cod
    Saturday Sea Bass

    I had no idea about mercury levels and found out that sea bass can contain quite a bit, I am only 7 weeks pregnant and now really worried the I have done some lasting damage, needless to say I am not eating fish for a while now, just wondering if you have had babies before after a pregnancy diet of fish and everything was just fine, or not?
     
  2. claire671

    claire671 Well-Known Member

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    Hi I'm not sure I can help but I didn't want to read and run. I'm not so sure on mercury levels in fish, to be honest I never listen to anything like that as it's all trace levels anyway and apparently nothing is good for us now! I would avoid shellfish as advised but for something like Sea Bass I'm sure is ok. Maybe check with your doctor or midwife but try not to let it worry you xx

    Added:
    Hi again, just did a little research and apparantly Sea Bass is fine as long as you do not have more than two portions of it per week. Don't cut out fish altogether as oily fish is a great source of omega 3 xx
     
    #2 claire671, Feb 26, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2012
  3. Sunbeam638

    Sunbeam638 Well-Known Member

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    You can eat most types of fish when you're pregnant or breastfeeding. Eating fish is good for your health and your baby’s development. However, you should avoid eating some types of fish and limit the amount you eat of others.
    Fish to avoid during pregnancy
    When you're pregnant or trying to get pregnant, do not eat:
    shark
    swordfish
    marlin
    These types of fish contain high levels of mercury, which can damage your baby’s developing nervous system.**
    For information about avoiding raw shellfish, see Can I eat shellfish during pregnancy?
    Fish to limit during pregnancy
    Tuna
    When you're pregnant or trying to get pregnant, you should limit the amount of tuna you eat because it also contains high levels of mercury. Don’t eat more than:
    two tuna steaks a week (weighing about 140g when cooked or 170g raw)
    four medium-sized cans of tuna a week (about 140g*a can when drained)
    Oily fish
    Pregnant women should also limit how much oily fish they eat because it contains pollutants such as dioxins and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). Don’t eat more than two portions of oily fish a week. Oily fish includes:
    fresh tuna (canned tuna doesn’t count as oily fish)
    salmon
    trout
    mackerel
    herring
    sardines
    pilchards
    Other fish
    You should also limit how much you eat of some other fish that are not regarded as oily. Don’t eat more than two portions a week of:
    dogfish (rock salmon)
    sea bass
    sea bream
    turbot
    halibut
    crab
    Fish to limit during breastfeeding
    When you’re breastfeeding:
    Don’t eat more than one portion of shark, swordfish or marlin a week (this advice is the same as for all adults).
    Don’t eat more than two more portions a week of oily fish.
    You don’t need to limit the amount of canned tuna you eat while you’re breastfeeding.
    Eating other fish during pregnancy and breastfeeding
    Fish is an important part of a healthy diet. It’s a good source of protein and contains many vitamins and minerals. As part of a healthy diet, the general advice is to eat at least two portions of fish a week, at least one of which should be oily fish.
    While you’re pregnant, trying to get pregnant or breastfeeding, you should also remember the advice above. You don’t need to limit or avoid other types of white and non-oily fish, such as:
    cod
    haddock
    plaice
    coley
    skate
    hake
    flounder
    gurnard


    Hope this helps, NHS website is very informative :)

    I think avoid Alaskan salmon apparently that does have higher levels than British salmon xxxx
     
  4. Sunbeam638

    Sunbeam638 Well-Known Member

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    So in a word your fine :)
     
  5. baby2012lp

    baby2012lp Well-Known Member

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    Thank you wonderful ladies, I know I am being paranoid and need to relax a little
     
  6. ams25

    ams25 Well-Known Member

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    Oh I was worried about this too as I've totally been craving tuna! But as long as you limit the amounts on that list you'll be fine hun :) everything you've eaten is okay apart from the sea bream, and even that you can have 2 portions a week hun :)

    I know what you mean about worrying about food, its a flamin' minefield isn't it? I went out for a meal the other day and they had the most amazing buffet selection of starters... Everyone was piling their plates up but I didn't know what half of it was so I didn't know if I could eat it, and there was a lot of stuff you defo can't eat like parma ham, pate, soft cheese, prawns or pasta salads made with home-made mayo. I think I ended up with one bread roll and some plain salad with no dressing, as that was the only thing I knew I could defo eat. I had to pretend I wasn't that hungry and I was STARVING! Lol xxx
     
    #6 ams25, Feb 26, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2012

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