Are Xray's Safe??

Discussion in 'Third Trimester' started by K X, Nov 17, 2005.

  1. K X

    K X Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,618
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi I am just back from the fracture clinic, got to keep the cast on for another 2 weeks atleast. The specialist there said in 2 weeks I will need to get an xray, I said no way but he told me at my stage it is fine as the baby is developed. It's a complete contradiction to what the Dr said on arrival at A&E on Sat, she said they aren't keen on doing it, but it's entirely my decision.

    Is there a risk at my stage do you know? And if so what is the harm? maybe the baby might be born like hulk with too much radiation!;o) I am sceptical and don't want it done.

    Any advice/comments would be appreciated ladies. Thanks xxx
     
  2. Urchin

    Urchin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    16,848
    Likes Received:
    0
    If I were you I would find out exactly how necessary the X-ray is. Can you just keep the cast on an extra week instead to be sure?
    Found this online:

    Question: Is it safe to have an X-ray during pregnancy?

    BabyCentre Editorial Team: It depends on the type of X-ray you need and exactly how much radiation you're going to be exposed to. The greater your exposure to radiation, the greater the risk to your baby. Most diagnostic X-rays (dental X-rays, for example) do not expose the fetus to high enough levels of radiation to cause a problem. While fetal exposure over 10 rads (the unit of measurement for absorbed radiation) has been shown to increase the risks for learning disabilities and eye abnormalities, you needn't worry. It's rare for a diagnostic X-ray to exceed 5 rads.

    For example, the amount of radiation that a baby gets from a mother's dental X-ray is only 0.01 millirad. Since a rad is equal to 1,000 millirads, one would have to have 100,000 dental X-rays for the baby to receive just one rad. Other estimated fetal doses are 60 millirads for a chest X-ray, 290 millirads for an abdominal X-ray, and 800 millirads for a computerised tomographic (CT) scan. For perspective, during the normal course of pregnancy your baby is exposed to about 100 millirads of natural radiation from the sun and earth.

    Although the risk from diagnostic X-rays is low, experts often recommend that women postpone getting unnecessary X-rays until after giving birth. However, if your doctor feels X-rays are needed for your particular medical situation, it may ease your mind to know that the amount of radiation your baby will receive will most likely be well within the safe range. On the day of the test, make sure the radiographer knows that you are pregnant so she can properly shield you.
     
  3. Urchin

    Urchin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    16,848
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. K X

    K X Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 27, 2005
    Messages:
    1,618
    Likes Received:
    0
    OMG that is soo scary, looks like I wont be having 1! Im going to print that out and take it along to my next appointment. Sometimes they look at you as though you are an over protective/paranoid mum 2 b, but I'd rather Becky Bump was safe than sorry.

    Thanks Urchin for your help. The consequence of not having an xray is that I would be in ankle to thigh cast until after she was born! Labour with a cast on-nightmare!

    Big hugs to you Urchin, not long 4 u now xxx
     
  5. Urchin

    Urchin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    16,848
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good luck with that and let us know what the docs say!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice