TTC education?

Discussion in 'Trying to Conceive' started by Steelgoddess, Nov 21, 2007.

?

Do you think they should teach you how to TTC in sex education?

  1. Yes that would be a great idea

  2. No that would be a bad idea

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. Steelgoddess

    Steelgoddess Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Messages:
    5,006
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thought this might be interestting what do you girlies think?

    And could be the positives and the negatives?
     
  2. mrs_tommo22

    mrs_tommo22 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2007
    Messages:
    11,068
    Likes Received:
    0
    I voted yes - but could be good or bad with school kids that think having a baby is like a trophy like they did when i was ta school!

    If they had taught it i wouldbe more prepared for it - things alwasy come back to you!
     
  3. mrs_metal

    mrs_metal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2007
    Messages:
    1,014
    Likes Received:
    0
    I put yes but I think it should be more about exactly how their bodies worked so they'd understand their bodies better, they could then use that knowledge for prevention as well as TTC (hopefully later on!) also I think they should be taught what a responsibility a child is, but I don't really know what the current sex education is like.

    I went to convent school (I won't say how many years ago!) and the sex education was basic, along the lines of that's male STAY AWAY FROM IT!!!
     
  4. Loola

    Loola Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Messages:
    1,780
    Likes Received:
    0
    Funnily enough I was thinking about this topic the other day. We are told throughout our youth that you can get pregnant after just one time at any time, even when on your period and that the male doesnt even have to ejaculate to get you pregnant, all of which is true, but it is scaremongering to some extent as it is highly unlikely in any of those circumstances. However, that certainly put me off having unsafe sex when I was younger. Im sure If I had known how hard it would be to concieve I would have been alot less careful about contraception, as as a teenager you dont really think you are going to get an STD do you!

    So I shall vote no, as I think it is wiser not to tell very young girls exactly the best way to get pregnant, what a can of worms that could turn out to be. My partners 15 year old brother has just fallen 'in love' for the first time and he has admitted to me that they are sleeping with each other. We were talking about my partner and I trying for a baby and I really didnt want to tell him that it wasnt as easy as he has been led to believe, as I think he would be careless with his girlfriend. The last thing I want is a 14 year old getting pregnant by mistake and not me!! :wink:
     
  5. babydust

    babydust Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Messages:
    2,287
    Likes Received:
    0
    i think i would say no as alot of young people may just use protection incase they get pregnant and not incase of any std's i think if they knew how hard it could be to get pregnant i.e only fertile for a few days of the month, i think alot of young people may have sex without protection. I know std's are more common now than what they were when i was that age but my main reason for using protection was to prevent pregnancy rather than an std.
     
  6. DaisyRose

    DaisyRose Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think women in particular should be taught more about the monthly cycle - I didn't have a clue that I couldn't get pregnant at any time of the month until I was well into my 20s. And as someone else said, it could help for prevention although it should be never be advertised to teenagers as contraception (that's where the STD education should come in, and they should do more of that too).

    I really don't think the vast majority of teenagers want to get pregnant; I certainly didn't, and didn't know of anyone who did. Those who do probably will anyway being as physically, one is supposed to be at their most fertile in their teens.
     
  7. NickyB

    NickyB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,074
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm going to say no. I'm thinking if you make it sound to kids like the miracle it is, then you might get them taking more risks. I mean how fluky have to got to be to get al the factors right, you could imagine kids thinking of taking the risk of unprotected sex because the chances of getting pregnant dont seem very high.

    Also, from reading that Toni Weschler book, most people are still told these days that you ovulate around day 14 and this isn't true with most. If a teenager takes this 'factoid' for granted, surely it means that you won't get pregnant if you have unprotected sex on days 1-13 and 15 - 28?

    I think keep a little of the mystery in there to make them fear it could happen to them.

    I, however, could use some learnin'!
     
  8. sunnyday

    sunnyday Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2007
    Messages:
    595
    Likes Received:
    0
    I vote No. I don't think its appropriate to 'teach' children how to get pregnant, more important to teach them how to avoid pregnancy and protect themselves from STDs. However, I do think that a better understanding of how the reproductive system works would be a good thing.

    To be honest, I can't really remember my sex ed, I know I was taught it but it went in one ear and out the other!

    There should be more help & information with TTC for responsible adults wanting to start a family though, most GPs are rubbish and don't really understand the lengths us women go to to get preggers.
     
  9. kmac

    kmac Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,294
    Likes Received:
    0
    I totally agree with sunnyday.
    I'm a science teacher and we have to teach reproduction (just the basics!) to 13/14 year olds. I think lots of them would think it OK to have unprotected sex if they thought it was unlikely they would end up pregnant. They take enough risks as it is.

    There should be evening classes or something for people like us to go to though!
     
  10. Little miss pink

    Little miss pink Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Messages:
    934
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm not realy sure but i certainly know that i think it is shocking that i got to 28 knowing so little about my body its cycles and symptoms and fertility in general.

    Maybe it would be a good thing to teach it in sex education but maybe at a very very late stage. It might also help the people/young people at risk of unwanted pregnancies know when in their cycles they are most at risk so they might be more inclined to be careful or hopefully say no altogether!!

    :hug:

    LMP x
     
  11. CB23

    CB23 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2006
    Messages:
    655
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with not to teach it at school for the reasons noted but I do wish I had known in my late twenties that getting pregnant isn't always easy and I really really really wish someone had sat me down and explained that getting pregnant doesn't mean you will have a baby and that there is at least a 50% possibility you will mc your first pregnancy.
     
  12. choklatemunky

    choklatemunky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,427
    Likes Received:
    0
    I too think school is too early but I wish that I had known more about ttc before I started doing it - a lot of the time it seems like you are finding out stuff too late (i.e. I didnt know until after I came off the pill that it can take a while for your body to get back to normal and I wish Id known that earlier so I could have planned things better/sooner - there is also a whole bunch of stuff I really hadn't a clue about until I looked into ttc - and I wish I had been told it all before!)

    I think that it would help a great deal if, when ppl were given BC (of any type) they were told of the amount of time it would take for their bodies to 'return to normal' after coming off it - so you knew where you stood from the start so to speak.

    I think too many ppl assume it is gonna be really easy but its not that simple.
     
  13. Tillytots

    Tillytots Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    4,885
    Likes Received:
    0
    I voted no because I think it would result in far too many unwanted babies :cry:

    I think sex education is totally rubbish at schools though and really should be revised. I know for one I will teach my kids about it myself, holding nothing back. Im very honest and open and have no qualms about discussing anything. I can talk to my own Mum about anything and I mean ANYTHING which I am very grateful for. She gave me advice on TTC too, and told me about her own experiences with TTC too.

    I do think there should definately be TTC workshops for people to attend though and TTC clubs where women & men can go to share their experiences and learn about TTC. I feel that only people who were serious about having children would attend.
     
  14. DaisyRose

    DaisyRose Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,015
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi everyone,

    Being sat in front of videos about AIDs for a day at school certainly put me off unprotected sex for years and years!!!
     
  15. libs

    libs Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    4,506
    Likes Received:
    0
    I voted no - only because I think the time available should be dedicated to preventing pregnancy. Sometimes in here I think we forget how many pregnancies happen by accident - with no help

    As adults we can find out all the info we need to HELP ttc - as teenagers we're less likely to research how to prevent ttcing :wink:
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice