Oxford journals - study results.

Discussion in 'Long Term TTC & Fertility Issues' started by LouiseB, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. LouiseB

    LouiseB Well-Known Member

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    I was just hitting the Oxford journals (as you do while looking for miracle infertility cures :whistle:) and i came across some articles that apply to some of your ladies so though i'd share.

    Apparently our uterus lining goes through a constant process called Angeogenisis which is where new blood vessels are formed rather than using existing ones and there is evidence to suggest that this process is less intense in women who suffer recurrent miscarriages.

    Apparently baby girls born from ICSI are more prone to pubertal obesity.

    Apparently girls with lower BMI are much more likely to suffer more severe endometriosis (thats a nice change from blaming the bulge)

    Apparently folic acid during ttc is very very extremely important.

    Apparently the chance of a full term male baby reduces with age due to male foetus' being more vulnerable to maternal stresses.

    Ok, that's your lot! :)
     
    #1 LouiseB, Jan 12, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2012
  2. maybe baby

    maybe baby Well-Known Member

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    Interesting thanks Lou...:)

    Xx
     
  3. laurat

    laurat Well-Known Member

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    This is all very interesting Lou! Xxx
     
  4. Gizzy Kelly

    Gizzy Kelly Well-Known Member

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    Morning Lou! Good research. Xxxx
     
  5. charliebear

    charliebear Well-Known Member

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    Some interesting info there :) x
     
  6. LouiseB

    LouiseB Well-Known Member

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    Oh! Victory :good:

    I found a technique called Assisted Oocyte Activation where they basically force the egg to fertilise using chemicals (which makes it risky) and it significantly increases fertilisation rates.

    There is still a question mark over live pregnancy rates, but it has happened so that's better than no hope at all :)
     
  7. itisbabytime

    itisbabytime Well-Known Member

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    i love random snippets of information - keep them coming!
     
  8. LouiseB

    LouiseB Well-Known Member

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    Ok... so today we have:

    Apparently it is more cost effective to freeze your eggs than having to have IVF later in life.

    Apparently an AMH test is essential for diagnosing PCOS (you ladies might already know that one).

    Apparently recurrent chemical pregnancy loss is not a contribution to unexplained infertility. People with unexplained infertility do not achieve implantation unless it progresses into a clinical pregnancy.

    Apparently women who have a BMI over 25 are twice as likely to miscarry than those with a healthy BMI.

    Apparently stress does not influence IVF outcome.
     
    #8 LouiseB, Jan 13, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2012
  9. Vickyxx

    Vickyxx Well-Known Member

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    Awwww Lou you are just a fountain of knowledge ;) lol
     
  10. Gizzy Kelly

    Gizzy Kelly Well-Known Member

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    Love this, and glad to see my AMH test is accurate. Mine was 19 and it had to be over 60 for PCOS, but until now I was not sure how accurate that was because it is relatively new. Thanks for clarifying that...

    xxx
     

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