Miscarriage & the Benefits of Aspirin

Discussion in 'Coping with Miscarriage & Loss' started by Rachael, Jul 24, 2005.

  1. Rachael

    Rachael Well-Known Member

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    The Benefits of Aspirin

    Baby aspirin, or low dose aspirin in a dosage of 81mg per tablet, is very beneficial to fertility. There are many other benefits to taking aspirin - such as benefiting the cardiovascular system (because of it's anticoagulative or nonclotting properties), pain reliever (analgesic) and fever reducer. People with heart problems take an aspirin daily, as a precaution to ward off potential heart attacks. If you are allergic to aspirin, have gastrointestinal problems or have problems with your blood clotting, I would suggest not taking it. In fact, anyone interested in beginning aspirin therapy should first seek the advice of their care provider.
    You should consider the benefits of aspirin, especially if you have suffered from a miscarriage. But even if you haven't, taking the aspirin can still be beneficial in helping to prevent some future miscarriages. Some miscarriages are caused by a poorly lined uterus. Some are caused from the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. These are proteins which appear to be related to coagulation problems -which can cause recurrent fetal loss. This happens when there is a disruption in the placental blood flow, due to clotting. The aspirin reduces the risk of clotting.
    As for helping with the utering lining, it is believed that aspirin helps with the blood flow to the ovaries and uterus. Though this has not been fully researched, taking an aspirin a day certainly cannot hurt. Because of the benefits listed above to the cardiovascular system, it stands to reason that if it also helps with fertility, why not give it a try? I take aspirin myself as I have had 3 previous miscarriages (Later attributed to Anticardiolipin Antibodies)
    Some doctors will okay taking low dose or baby aspirin in pregnancy, though the majority will not. Ask your doctor, as soon as you become pregnant, as to whether or not to continue with the aspirin.
    It doesn't matter what brand of aspirin you choose, as long as it has no more than 81 mg per tablet. This will be in either the chewable baby aspirins, or in the adult low dose aspirin. The tablets are very small and easy to swallow. You only need to take one tiny pill per day to reap the benefits. Taking one low dose or baby aspirin (81 mg) a day is a good thing to add to the supplements you are already taking. If you are suspicious about miscarriages, or have suffered from them in the past, ask your doctor about aspirin. It could very well be what the doctor orders.
     
  2. mdsremos

    mdsremos Well-Known Member

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    I went to the chemist today and asked for baby aspirin (didnt feel like explaining why I wanted it personally having suffered a miscarriage in June at 5.5 weeks so lied and said it was for a friends child) and was told it was not available as aspirin is dangerous for children!!

    Not sure where else to get it from and I am due to ovulate this week so unsure what to do????
     
  3. Rachael

    Rachael Well-Known Member

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    Hiya

    Ask for low dose Aspirin - Pharmacists tend to know what that it. Most low dose aspirin will come as 75mg or 82mg dose, so just tell them you want anything less than 85mg Aspirin.

    I get my aspirin from boots. It's 75mg disperable. I got strange looks too when I first asked for Baby Aspirin....You live and learn eh? lol!

    Best of luck!
     
  4. mdsremos

    mdsremos Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that, sent a friend to Boots at lunchtime (yes I chickened out and gave her a post-it note with the details on) and she came back with 75mg dispersable ones!! Whahay....
    Certainly will give anything a try as we've nothing to lose. Dont taste very nice but I'm sure they're doing their job, just dispersed in a small amount of water and down the hatch.
    Will let you know how we get on.
     
  5. Kerry

    Kerry Well-Known Member

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    Please go careful.........I don't want to stamp on this but aspirin can also increase the risk of miscarriage in some women.

    Please read.............

    Question: Is it safe to take aspirin during pregnancy?

    Answer: In most cases, no, although there are specific circumstances in which your caregiver might advise you to take a very small daily dose. While it's highly unlikely that taking a single dose of aspirin in early or mid-pregnancy will have any harmful effect, the drug can cause problems for your baby (and you) when taken regularly in normal adult doses while you're pregnant, so it's best to avoid it altogether during this time. However, if you're already taking a prescribed dose of aspirin for a specific condition, you may need to continue taking it, but you should check with your healthcare provider before taking any aspirin during pregnancy or while you're trying to conceive.

    Here's why: Studies have linked aspirin to various pregnancy complications. A few studies show that taking aspirin around the time of conception and in early pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage. And some researchers believe that taking aspirin at adult doses in pregnancy might affect the baby's growth and may slightly increase the risk of a placental abruption. Finally, taking full-dose aspirin later in pregnancy might delay labor and increase the risk of heart and related lung problems in your newborn, and bleeding complications for you and your baby.

    However, in certain situations, your caregiver may advise you to take a small dose of aspirin each day (usually no more than one-quarter of the normal adult dose), and most experts believe this low-dose aspirin therapy is safe. One example: Some experts believe that women with a condition called antiphospholipid syndrome (diagnosed in women who have specific antibodies in their blood and who also have either have a history of blood clots or certain types of pregnancy problems) benefit from taking low-dose aspirin in addition to a drug called heparin beginning early in pregnancy. Other research shows that some women at high risk for preeclampsia (including women with chronic hypertension, severe diabetes, or kidney disease, or who had severe preeclampsia in a prior pregnancy) may benefit from low-dose aspirin therapy, though not everyone agrees on who is a good candidate for this treatment.

    So unless your healthcare provider prescribes it, you should avoid taking aspirin altogether, as well as other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen sodium (Aleve), and ketoprofen (Orudis) and others, which can have similar affects. Check the labels of all over-the-counter drugs (or better yet, check with your caregiver or pharmacist) before taking them to make sure they don't contain NSAIDs. (It can be hard to tell because some products list their ingredients under different names; aspirin is sometimes called "salicylate" or "acetylsalicylic acid," for example.) When you need to take something for pain relief while you're pregnant, acetaminophen (Tylenol) is considered safe to use as directed on the label.
     

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