Hard job & pregnancy

Discussion in 'Pregnancy Chat' started by silvnaru, Aug 16, 2016.

  1. silvnaru

    silvnaru Member

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    Hello, I am a total newbie when it comes to pregnancy and all the legal stuff. At the moment I am working a very physically heavy and hard job, I have to lift heavy stuff like big microwaves and big TVs. When should I tell my employer that I am pregnant? I am almost 6 weeks now. And when can you leave work for maternity leave? When is the earliest date that you can take it? Also, if I am an agency worker, can they end my job just because I am pregnant? What should I do? Please help. This is my first time being pregnant and I am originally not from UK, so I dont know how it works here.
     
  2. Rubyredslipper

    Rubyredslipper Well-Known Member

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    I think it varies from workplace to workplace, can you find the maternity policy?
    I had to tell my employer no later than 15 weeks before I was due which is quite late (told them at 14 weeks so it wasn't an issue) and I could start maternity leave no earlier than 11 weeks before I was due (I'm on leave at the moment but officially start 2 weeks before I am due) but my policy specifically states it doesn't apply to agency workers.
    I'm not sure what rules and regs apply to agency staff I'm afraid as I've never worked through one. Can you speak to the agency?
     
  3. silvnaru

    silvnaru Member

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    I will speak to my agency next time I see them, but I wanted to be sure before I ask. I do not know where to find the maternity policy also... this is so stressful..
     
  4. Rubyredslipper

    Rubyredslipper Well-Known Member

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    Every workplace should have one, it's just whether it will cover you. I think your best option would be to speak to the agency first, they may have their own. You could also speak to a manager at work to get a copy x
     
  5. silvnaru

    silvnaru Member

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    Thank you xx
     
  6. ClaireDoll

    ClaireDoll Well-Known Member

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    If you work a strenuous lifting job you need to tell them asap, I have had three miscarriages and now have to tell my employer of a similar job as soon as I find out I'm pregnant, not sure how it works with agency work if you'll get maternity pay etc but you can't be doing a heavy lifting job it's too high risk, they need to carry out a risk assessment and find you alternative work to do instead.
     
  7. Sparklegirl

    Sparklegirl Well-Known Member

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    Is there a company intranet at all where you work? If there is have a search on there but if you are doing work like that, I dont know if there will be something for you to look at without asking.

    Otherwise, have a look on the website of the agency you are with to see if there is anything they have on there to help you before asking them. Good luck, I totally agree that you need to be very careful about heavy lifting as it could have serious consequences
     
  8. MrsB2105

    MrsB2105 Well-Known Member

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    Maternity leave can start from 11 weeks before due date
    I told my employer from about 5/6 weeks as I work in radiology so they have to implement a safe working environment.
    Maybe you could selected people so they can give you a safer role?
    I can't really answer the agency questions
    Also congratulations x
     
  9. Prettypee

    Prettypee Well-Known Member

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    You need to let them no asap for safety reasons. Maternity leave can be taken from 11 weeks prior to birth and you can take up to a year. You shouldn't be able to get fired or let go due to " being pregnant" as this would be illegal for them to do so however some crafty companies might try to dress it up with a different reason( i.e. poor performance). They are not allowed to penalise you for taking any pregnancy related sick days either ( this is recorded seperately from general sickness policy) I'm not sure how maternity pay benefits work for agency staff- I assume you would get maternity allowance rather than statutory pay which the company does not have to pay out. (ma is directly paid by government to you). Xx

    Sent from my D6603 using Tapatalk
     
  10. Pambi

    Pambi Well-Known Member

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    Your agency is your employer so all the maternity info will be available from them. The company you work for also need to adhere to health and safety protocol so should be informed. Neither the agecy or company you work for can end your contract based on your pregnancy and both would be liable if they did by breaching the Equality Act. Pregnancy is a protected characteristic and it doesn't matter how long you have worked there (in case they say this) you are protected regardless of length of service. Speaking as a HR person who specialises in employment law.
     
  11. Carla81

    Carla81 Well-Known Member

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    Just for u to know heavy lifting etc doesnt bare any risk of mc, its just that during pregnancy ur ligaments and muscles soften and loosen so if u do lift heavy things u are more at risk of injuring yourself - doesnt pose a risk to baby just thought i would let u know that as most people assume wrongly that its harmful to baby.
    But yes if u have a physical job u should let employer know asap and yeah 11 wks before due date is earliest u can claim maternity pay x
     

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