Delayed vaccination?

Discussion in 'Alternative Parenting' started by BunnyN, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    I know vaccination is a subject that tends to get heated and I really don't want to start world war 3 here but I'm hoping for some practical guidance. Due to health issues and family history of reaction to vaccines we decided to delay vaccination of our LO. We are thinking about starting at either 6 months or 1 year but I'm not sure about how to go about it. We also want to separate the vaccines as much as possible but I have no idea how they should be timed, spaced or at what ages. Obviously she wont be getting them at the standard times. I'm concerned that doctors will only be interested in her 'catching up' as quickly as possible and it's not something we want to rush. Can anyone tell me how they did it or point me in the direction of resources on delayed vaccination.
     
  2. BevG

    BevG Well-Known Member

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    i think if you look at the other vax threads inky had her kids done seperate as he son had a horrendous reaction to them. as for spacing them out i can understand it if your likely to have a reaction maybe just get 1 at 12 weeks, then another at 24 etc instead and space them that way, a little immunity early on would be better than none so early start best. breastfeeding would really help to boost babies natural immunities as well. talk to the dr maybe?
     
  3. HL28

    HL28 Well-Known Member

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    We're still yet to have lo's third lot done. We're convinced she reacted to the second lot. Hospital couldn't definitely confirm this so obviously we're concerned about the third lot. But we've asked doing one at a time and just get well it's not protocol!!!! Etc. Frustrating isn't the word. She's 7 months and we're considering doing them now but mainly because they've now dropped it from 3 jabs to 2!! Xxx
     
  4. Jayjay027

    Jayjay027 Well-Known Member

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    Sophia had a bad reaction to her 1st jabs at 8wks old (she stopped breathing) my dr's surgery werent concerned and wanted to continue on as normal but I demanded for her to be referred to a paediatrician at the hospital. I didnt want her to have any more jabs but hubby and the dr's made me feel like a bad mum for feeling that way and in the end, she got her 2nd set at 7 months at the hospital. She didnt have any adverse reactions and the appt was made for her 3rd set which she got last week at 13 months old. Again, no bad reactions.
    If ur concerned, I'd suggest speaking with ur gp and asking for a referral to the vaccination clinic at the children's hospital x

    Sent from my GT-S6810P using Tapatalk 2
     
  5. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the answers ladies. Doctors haven't been much help. They are just horrified that she hasn't had them yet and basically say that severe reactions are impossible, something unfortunately know not to be true. It is fustrating because they act like we have unreasonable, radical veiws yet they are the ones that wont even listen to our concerns. I am not anti vaccines, I do believe they do good but that doesn't stop me from having concerns. They start with vaccines from birth here. We decided to delay them until 2 months but at two months she was loosing weight and we decided we needed to work out what was going on with her before adding to the mix. Unless we can find a doctor to work with us I think all we can do is say what we want and when but we are going to have to work that out ourselves.
     
  6. PyscoFalcon

    PyscoFalcon Well-Known Member

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    Can't you have them done at the hospital?
    I had bad reactions to my jabs and bro can't have them as allergic to egg.

    So Katie had her's done with a specalist and hospital transfer on standby. She was fine tho. Maybe talk to hospital about it and see what they say?
     
  7. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I will ask to do them in the hospital. I didn't have an instant reaction though it was more delayed. I was unwell for several months after and the doctor believed it to be caused by the vaccinations and acctually advised I not get any more jabs.
     
    #7 BunnyN, Sep 12, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2013
  8. inky

    inky Well-Known Member

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    Hi, my son reacted to his second lot of jabs and so I delayed the third set until he was 10 months old. He was fine that time thankfully :) I amended his schedule as I didn't want him to have the MMR - I went private and paid for single vax in the end. I just told my health visitor that he wouldn't be having it and that was that!

    I also delayed my daughters jabs by 4 weeks each time, so instead of having them at 12, 16 and 20 weeks, she had them at 16, 24 and 32 weeks old. She won't be having the MMR either. Touch wood, no problems so far!! Again, I just told the health visitor how it was going to be, and she booked us in with the practice nurse to get them done when I wanted.

    Ultimately the schedule, and which vaccinations your child receives, are up to you :)
     
  9. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, it's nice to know I'm not the only one in a position like this. I'm thinking about skipping MMR too, at least until she is older and pregnancy becomes something to think about.
     
  10. Foxini

    Foxini Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to be delaying jabs with this baby, there is a great alternative vaccinacting schedule i believe by Dr Sears.
     
  11. k8_005

    k8_005 Well-Known Member

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    I think skipping the mmr is risky you might be better to have them done single vaccs privately that wayy not such a risk for child.and less for immune to cope with. I agree bf as much as possible and I would see if your hospital has a children's vaccine specific specialist that you can explain and address concerns too it doesn't sound radical to me and I'm someone who has just had her baby have his 8weeks. But if I had history in family would also do as you are. Good luck x
     
  12. Kester

    Kester Well-Known Member

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    My son has the 2, 3 and 4 month ones on time, but i delayed mmr untill he was 3 and starting nursery, this was a long time ago now, and there were still concerns about mmr floating about at the time, my brother had a bad reaction to mmr when he was a kid so it seemed sensible to wait on our case, i think your concerns are very reasonable, ust take your time with descisions, i think its worth sticking to spacing once you start a course, but you dont have to have them all at once.
     
  13. papella

    papella Well-Known Member

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    Yes I will be delaying if not not giving my little one her vaccinations, your antibodies are still present in baby until at least 6 months if not longer and baby doesn't start producing their own antibodies in any significant amount until a year old, so pointless giving vax before then
     
  14. HannahNeale

    HannahNeale Well-Known Member

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    Sorry -just gatecrashing this thread here -is it ok (i.e still effective) to have the first 3 lots spaced out more than 4 weeks apart? I really didn't fancy having them all so close together. I don't like all this pressure they put on with vaccinations!!
     
  15. MrsG81

    MrsG81 Well-Known Member

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    I can totally understand people wanting to delay / give single vaccines where children have had a bad reaction to a vaccine or reactions run in the family, but for those who don't have that problem, do you not worry that your child will catch some of the diseases that they are vaccinating again?

    Not trying to start a big debate or anything, I know there are some risks with vaccines, I'm just trying to understand why delay without any reason to? Surely that just gives your child a bigger window of where they could catch a disease?
     
  16. JD.Deedee

    JD.Deedee Well-Known Member

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    There's a risk with getting complications with illness under 6 - 12 months anyway.

    You don't know whether the actual response was sufficient. Your or my child might easily be in the 15-25% that doesn't have sufficient immune response and in that case it can be years until the acquired anti-bodies required to be fully protected isn't 6 or 12 months but more likely to be 3y+

    Therefore relying on the vaccine to be effective at this age on it's own is quite unreliable. It's also about the people around the infant but we don't target adults only pregnant women which in my opinion isn't enough to provide actual herd immunity.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140624220025.htm

    There's enough evidence available that vaccines tend to wane off and it seems we feel like just adding an extra set to the initial series or adding more boosters will be the solution. Though in my opinion doing this but then stopping this again by teen years and completely not advocating for adults to get their boosters like we got called in with the menigitis C hype to get jabbed let's do this with adults AND teenagers. And pensioners and everyone else for that matter.

    I do think adults do spread more easily than children. It's children that travel with their parents. It's not like the maternity wards hold daily school trips and school children are coming in by the mass.

    The moment I most fear contracting ANY illness is when I fly or use any other form of public transport that is forcing me to be in a confined closed space. I avoid crowded placed anyway because they give me hives and a bad mood. I hate other people in that respect. Especially when it's around christmas and every dick and harry is getting their christmas shop and feels like taking their little one with them despite this littl'n having a barking cough that makes it sound like a dog throwing up whilst touching all the toys they weren't planning on buying. Seriously it makes my blood boil.

    When my little one was under 6 months old he hardly ever went shopping with me to avoid him getting sick from anything. He only caught a cold at 3-4 months when traveling abroad.

    He's since had a range of coughs and colds. They're the worst when travelling abroad on a plane and teeth his teeth have been worse than anything else.

    He's had paracetamol about three times in his entire life and he's 20 months old.

    Polio doesn't worry me as there is no polio in the UK. You'll find polio in places such as Syria, pakistan and third world African countries. And I wasn't planning on taking my child anywhere near them places anytime soon.

    The last case of diphtheria death was recorded about 25 years ago.

    Tetanus is treated by giving tetanus immunoglobulins.

    Meningitis is generally treated with antibiotics. Note that meningitis can occur after a range of things even vaccinating.

    Whooping cough contagiousness wears off after 5 days of having started on antibiotics using antibiotics with suspected infection CAN stop the infection from developing in full blown pertussis.


    Measles has never been eradicated with any vaccine and it also doesn't provide long term efficiency. My uncle had measles twice as young as 8 months and later again. My mum too had measles. My nana has scars from her jabs in the 50's both were born in the 70's after the measles vaccine had already been included in the schedule.

    Mumps can make boys sterile, I do believe this is when caught later in life.

    Like measles the only recorded death in the UK is one of a 15 year old.

    Rubella isn't deadly it's believed it can cause complications in pregnancy.

    I've probably missed some.

    Just look at chicken pox for example. It's proper deadly and scary to catch chicken pox in the US. Look up chicken pox in the UK and only risk groups are given the vaccine .

    Me and my sisters all lived through the pox but like any other of the diseases, chicken pox too has been responsible for deaths.


    I don't know what else to cover so far. And I'm not finished on reading through the information and making conclusions. I do believe waiting and still vaccinating later for the ones really necessary will have a better response at say pre school age rather than infant-toddler age for PERSONAL protection. For herd immunity I will stick by my opinion that adults will hve to be targeted first for me to buy into it. This also included adults whom never even received a vaccine in the first place.


    I'm also more concerned in failure to diagnose properly from the GP than the illness itself. You only have to look for articles where baby's are sent home when mom's are right to worry about meningitis and the mum is advised it's viral and to just give some calpol.

    Which has also to do with the fact that GP's and other health care providers have insufficient medical history of myself, my child or my direct family members. And the inability to acknowledge adverse effects from vaccines that do not have official safety studies on pregnant women to wave off patients concern. This is just brushed down to e.g. hormones, being pregnant.
     
  17. Phoenix85

    Phoenix85 Well-Known Member

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    To put it simply, I am not afraid of the diseases.

    Polio is caught by contact with infected feces or direct contact with someone who has Polio. The majority of cases of Polio today are vaccine-induced Polio, due to the live OPV still being given in developing countries (Pakistan, Syria and parts of Africa etc). Added to that, only around 2% of Polio cases show symptoms, 98% are asymptomatic. Of that 2% only a small number suffer paralysis and it is usually temporary, lasting a day or two at the most. The widespread paralysis seen in the early 1900s is believed to be due to the practices at the time where limbs were stretched out & manipulated, which caused permanent damage.
    There's also controversy over whether Polio really ever went away or whether the medical field just changed the diagnosis. Certainly after the vaccine they changed the requirements of how certain symptoms had to present to be classed as Polio, before the vaccine, any paralysis was recorded as an effect of Polio, afterwards, the paralysis had to last more than a few days to be recorded. Today there are other illnesses which present the same as what was recorded as Polio prior to vaccination, but they are not called Polio (For example Guillain-Barré syndrome)

    I'm not worried about Measles or Mumps or Rubella or any other disease for which we vaccinate against. Evidence strongly suggests that most people get Rubella at some point in their childhood but the symptoms are so mild it's mistaken for a fever or viral infection or not noticed at all.
    Either they have died out long ago on their own (Diptheria for instance), or the vaccines are not effective.
    Anecdotally, I know 3 children who all got Measles. All 3 had been vaccinated with at least one dose of the MMR.
    Getting vaccinated does not guarantee you won't get ill, it just gives people a false sense of security.

    My youngest child is 9 in 2 weeks and had some vaccines until I decided to stop at 4 months, she's not had the MMR and never been ill with more than a cold.
    However, 6 months after she stopped breastfeeding she was diagnosed with Asthma. Something I can't be sure wasn't caused by vaccines. She also has allergies to pet fur, dust, hay & chickpeas. Oh and she always had eczema flare ups if I gave her dairy when she was little so she only has small amounts now of chocolate & cheese etc.


    The main thing for me though regarding vaccines is that after doing lots of research, reading studies both for and against, the bottom line is I don't want those ingredients near my children.

    For instance, the flu nasal mist they give children over 2 in the UK contains GMOs, Mono-sodium glutamate, pork gelatin (we're veggie, I'm vegan).

    Read the ingredients of the other vaccines and they are similar but with added aluminim and various other questionable ingredients.
     
    #17 Phoenix85, Nov 1, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2015
  18. yesol

    yesol Member

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    The delay on vaccines allows your child to have a more developed immune system and fuller functioning organs to excrete toxins from the vaccines.

    Vaccination, like any other medical procedure, should be a choice. And people should have informed choices of their own, not just because their neighbor or doctor said so. Read vaccine inserts and do research about the ingredients. With the information technology available, being ignorant is a choice.
     
  19. Juice

    Juice Well-Known Member

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    Im so glad I found this thread.

    I was met with horror and judgement every time I've talked about this with health care professionals, not to mention misinformation. The doctor was a little more willing to discuss it, but hv and nurses are bordering on nasty.

    One hv told me, "it's your choice not to vaccinate, but just be aware that she will probably get more coughs and colds that other children." Wtf?!

    It's about informed choice, and unfortunately the nhs do not provide all information to make a unbiased decision.
     
  20. GBLiz

    GBLiz Well-Known Member

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    since when do vacinnations help against common coughs and colds?!!

    i delay mine. I spread out the 6, 12, 18 week ones (or whatever they are supposed to be) . Both my two only had the 3rd one when they were over 1. I will probably give my son the MMr when he is about 5. I have read that the most likely time to have an adverse effect from it is between 12 and 18 months....exactly when it is normally given. If i had a choice i would only give him the mumps vaccine but it was withdrawn as there is no effective single vaccine (makes you wonder how it can be effective in a combi one?)

    this new baby i certainly wont be starting the vaccines at 6 weeks. i'll leave it a while even before giving the first
     
    #20 GBLiz, Mar 24, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2018

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