C - sections (didnt know where to put this)

Discussion in 'Second Trimester' started by -, Aug 12, 2005.

  1. Guest

    This is a really REALLY silly question as I'm not planning to have a c-section. But if it comes to it - what happens?

    I am SO scared of needles it's not even funny and the thought of having a spinal or and Epidural makes me want to run and hide. :oops: I can only just about cope with blood tests and even then I can't go on my own and have to hold someones hand and want to cry (even though I try and act brave!).

    I'm less scared of labour pain than I am of having an epidural :roll:

    And after you go get numbed, what happends then. All you ever see on birthing programmes is someone laying behind a screen (if they want to), the baby coming out and then that's it! I'm sure there is more to it than that right?

    Cheers in advance ladies for answering yet another strange question.
     
  2. Ragna

    Ragna Well-Known Member

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    Sami

    Even though I have already had five babies Sami, Im still scared about the birth again. Pathetic really, but I am.

    I had an epidural with my second child and although its not very nice to be honest, I cant recommend it enough. You dont have to see the needle, as you have to lie on your side away from the person doing it. You have to lie really really still. You can also be totally put out rather than stay awake, and this may happen if for some reason the epidural dosnt work.

    As for the Caesarian part, I havnt had one so not quite sure the procedure.

    Ragna xxxxxxxxxx
     
  3. -Cat-

    -Cat- Well-Known Member

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    Hiya Sami,
    Although this is my first baby, I have had epidurals twice before for spinal operations. Everyone is terrified of the idea of a big needle being stuck in their back, I too hate needles, and normally have childrens numbing cream on the site first so I dont feel the needle for IV's and stuff going in, Im such a wuss.
    The reality with an epi is, as Ragna says they get you to lie on your side very still, they then normally use a cold numbing spray on your back, (epis are usually sited right in your lower back.) they then give you a little local anesthetic so you dont actually feel them siting the epidural, which is a hollow needle which is insterted into the viod running up and down behind your vetebra (no-where near the membrane containing your spinal cord!) this needle is taped into place on your back and a combination of drugs are constantly topped up so you feel absolutly no pain. A lot of the time they will gradually lower/alter the dose so that when the time comes to push, its wearing off and you can feel some of what you are doing as opposed to being completly numb. you will need a catheter put in aswell as you will be unable to tell if you need to wee. This is a very safe form of pain relief and unlike pethadine has no harmfull effects on your baby. 3% on women may suffer head aches for a couple of days afterwards, and you have more chance of being hit by a jumbo jet than being paralysed by one.
    Normally a c-section would only be done with an epi, if you already had an epi in for pain relief before the decision is made to have a c-section, in which case they can just top it up and go for it straight away, Other wise you will be given a spinal block which is a single injection in to the membrane surrounding the spinal cord, (again chances of paralysis are rediculously small) you cannot use this as pain relief normally as unlike an epi that can be topped up continuously, a spinal block lasts for 2 hours and can only be given the once by a single injection.
    You will be hooked up to a drip and have a catheter to drain your wee, part of your pubic area will be shaved and you will wear anti-embolism stockings to prevent any DVTs, the screen will be put up and frrom first incision it takes about 5-10 mins for your baby to be born, they will imediatly put the baby in your chest so you can bond with your newborn. while the surgen stitches up the layers of muscle and skin etc. You may feel akward holding the baby on you as you will feel a bit numb, but your birth partner is allowed to be present so they can help you. Once the surgen is finished you will have pain killing drugs in your IV that will not affect you feeding your baby and will just make you more comfortable. You will have the baby tucked up in bed with you and will be able to breast feed. If however you go for a General anestetic (not the prefered option), your partner will not be allowed in the room, and once the baby has been born it will be taken out straigt to the father or birthing parner first as you will be unconsious, recovery is not so good from this option if you have had a general anesthetic before, you know what you will feel very tired and woozy for quite a while afterwards. So its best to go for the needle option! At least the needle is going into your back so you dont have to watch, I normally find that the worst bit, I cant watch a needle going in.
    This is the info given to me by by the obstetric anetheatist at my hospital as it may be a route I have to take.
    if you want more first hand info on what a c-section really feels like try asking layla as she has had them for both of her boys and is expecting to again third time round.
     
  4. Rosebay

    Rosebay Well-Known Member

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    I have a question about catheters as I've never had one and am thinking that I will probably opt for an epidural if I need one. When do they take the catheter out and does it hurt afterwards because you've had one in? I have suffered from recurring bouts of cystitus in the past and as a result my urethra is a bit scarred I think as even a brief bout of cystitus causes bleeding these days and it is more painful quicker. I manage to keep it at bay by being really really aware of how much I've drunk and all sorts of other self-help methods and so haven't needed antibiotics for it for a few years now. I am scared of what the whole labour process will effect that bit of my body though and want to go for whatever option is least likely to damage my already slightly damaged bits! Nothing reduces me to a blubbering wreck quicker than a bout of cystitus and I have to be constantly vigilant to guard against it so I really don't want to make the situation worse from here on in if I can possibly help it! Does anyone have any thoughts on catheters/trauma to the urethra during birth etc that might be helpful?

    Thanks a lot!
    +++
     
  5. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sami

    Everything that Cat said is correct, there is not much more to add. Except that i have had a c section under general and under spinal block and if I have to have a c section again this time i will be opting for a spinal block.

    For me the bit that hurt the most was the numbing needle (forgot what its called) but like Cat said you can request the numbing gel first. When i had the spinal block needle inserted it just felt a bit achey not at all sore, just a dull ache.

    I had a screen in front but it wasnt that high so i could see the doctor and nurses. My husband was on one side and there was a nurse on the other both answering anything i had to ask. After i had the spinal block they started the operation at 1.00 and Joshua was born safely at 1.07 and then it took about 10 minutes to stitch me up. It wasnt a bad experience at all.

    The reason why I am enquiring about a VBAC birth isnt because of a bad experience during the C section. And like a natural, once you see the baby everything youve had to endure during pregnancy and birth disappears.

    So good luck and dont worry.

    xx
     
  6. -Cat-

    -Cat- Well-Known Member

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    Hi Rosebay,
    with a catheter a thin rubber tube is inserted and slightly inflated to hold in in place, each time I had one they were in for three days along with my epidural. I couldnt feel it or feel myself weeing and I didnt feel them take it out either. I had no problems with cystitus after and everything is kept very clean, plus if your having one for a c-section it should be removed very soon after so I would think there is very little chance of infection.
     
  7. Guest

    Hmm they seem like wierd idea too catheters.

    What do they do after the baby is taken out? (Sounds so clinical sorry). I mean the 'sticthing up' routine sort of thing and recovery.

    I know hossie will tell me if I get it planned but if it's a rush I'd like to be a little bit emotionally prepared.

    xx
     
  8. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sami

    After the baby is out that is all that you will be concentrating on. I also felt quite drained after baby came out. They then start stitching you layer by layer, (i think that there are 7 layers of skin). I was told it would take about 20 - 30 minutes to complete but mine was done in 10 minutes. But i swear to you that you will not even noticing them stitching you up. After this is done they clean you up (which you still dont feel) and you are taken into recovery where you can bond and maybe try to feed your baby. You will stay there until feeling comes back into your legs, which feels really strange and tingerly.

    i was then taken down to the ward after a couple of hours. In my hospital i was not allowed out of bed for 24 hours and the catheter was taken out the next day (didnt hurt, didnt really feel anything). I was helped up to take a few steps. You tend to walk a bit hunched and they tell you to try and walk upright. This does hurt a bit but then i imagine if youve got loads of stitches after a natural birth then that would hurt just as much.

    Anymore questions just ask.

    xx
     
  9. Guest

    Can you compare the pain of an Epi to anything? Like a tattoo? I have one on my wrist which hurt (don't know how I can have tattoo's and piercings but scared of needles!) but what's it like? All they say on telly to the people is 'you might feel a sting then a bit of pressure' and the womens faces get all scrunched up like it hurts really bad.

    Does it take a long time to recover and can you still breast feed and stuff? Would my partner have to take more time off work than the 2 weeks paternity to help me out round the house and with the baby?
     
  10. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sami

    I have a tattoo on my shoulder and that stung when it was getting done.

    When they give you the anesthestic in your back that stings, so ask for some numbing cream to be available. The epi for me was just like a dull ache. it didnt hurt and i am sure that my face was all screwed up as i was waiting for the enormous pain that i thought that i would get. Honestly it was just like a dull ache and then it was over just as quick.

    i breast fed as soon as i was stitched up and cleaned up. My husband only took a week of as he is self employed but i had friends and family to help. They dont like you doing too much in the way of cleaning, as you will find that just looking after baby for the first few weeks is hard enough. You wont be able to lift a lot of things either. you just have to take things slowly. you yourself will know when to stop.

    xx
     
  11. tracyM

    tracyM Well-Known Member

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    I've only ever had general for c-section. They stick a line in your hand and that's the last you know about it. They'll only use a general in an emergency, so all the shaving and catheter bits get done while your going under. I'm getting worried about an epidural for this one, not about the actual needle, but that it either won't work properly, or that I'll have terrible side effects.

    After my first section with Callum, I had a two week stay in hospital, but that was because of other complications, rather than the section itself. Charlotte was born, under general, at 9.30pm on the Saturday, I was up and walking about next morning, and went home on the Tuesday morning. Tuesday afternoon I walked down to school with Charlotte in the pram (I regretted it afterwards!!!). Because she was born at night, and I slept off the general, I think it was a lot easier.

    When my catheter was removed, it was more uncomfortable than painful. They made me wee in a bed pan in the room, which I just couldn't do. I took the bed pan into the bathroom and did it there.

    After Callum, I remember having a morphine drip which I could press a button and it would deliver a dose when I wanted. Callum was in special care so I didn't really care how doped up I was. With Charlotte I didn't have morphine, just Kapake for one day, then paracetamol - think I was going through a stubborn stage!!.

    For me, the downsides of a section are the longer stay in hospital, and not being able to drive for 6 weeks (although you can get a doctors certificate to drive sooner). On the plus side, a private room :) , and with an elective, I know the day my new son/daughter will be born. As long as baby comes out fit and healthy, I'm not all that bothered about the way he/she comes out.
     
  12. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tracy

    I know that i have been speaking to you about the VBAC but i do agree with things that you say.

    I have had as you know both general and elective and i never had a private room, what hospital are you at? lol
     
  13. Guest

    Can't drive for 6 weeks?!!! Oh my god I best hope I don't have a c-sec - I live in the middle of no-where!!

    Does your tummy really hurt afterwards?
     
  14. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    hi Sami

    It hurts along the scar. But i didnt have any pain killers for both c sections. I might have a higher pain barrier though then some people. I remember it hurting for the first 3 days but then it gets easier. and i am sure that i drove before 6 weeks with my first (on my own with him) and with the second i didnt really need to drive around a lot as i lived in London then.

    If you have to have a c section you will be fine. My sister in law had a natural and she couldnt sit on anything other than a rubber ring for weeks. LOL

    xx
     
  15. tracyM

    tracyM Well-Known Member

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    Davina,
    Royal Lancaster Infirmary. The maternity ward has 4 or 6 single rooms and 4 4 bedded bays. One of the 4 bed rooms is reserved for ante natal, the other 3 are for maternity. The single rooms are prioritised for long stay and post section patients.

    After a section, they put you in a single room for the first couple of nights, then onto a normal room. I made sure I got out before being put into a shared room with Charlotte. With my stay before having Callum, I had a private room, but the lady in the room next door was also in for a long stay. It was fairly quiet so we asked if we could have a 4 bay room to ourselves, next door to the kitchen and they let us!!! We went back into private rooms when a gobby cow with 6 other kids joined us.

    For such a small town, we have a great hospital. There are three consultant obstetricians, but's still got a small and friendly feel about it. The midwife who delivered Daniel 12 1/2 years ago was on duty the day my waters broke with Charlotte 9 years later.

    Sami

    I didn't think it was so much painful, more an uncomfortable achy drag, but certainly not unbearable. I kept thinking that my wound would fall apart and that my insides would fall out, especially after a long walk. I found it easier to cope with that pain than SPD pain.

    Tracy xx
     
  16. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tracy

    Are you sure thats a hospital and not a hotel LOL, sounds wonderful.

    What does SPD stand for I am sure that i have been told before, but you know what your minds like when youre pregnant. LOL

    I really dont know whether to try for a VBAC or not as i didnt find the c section too bad. Decisions decision.

    xx
     
  17. Guest

    SPD is Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction. - During pregnancy hormones soften and stretch the ligaments of the body in order to allow the pelvis to open slightly during labour so that the baby can move easily through. Symphysis Pubis and/or lower back pain can occur as early as the 12th week of pregnancy. During pregnancy, and after, the Symphysis can gap slightly and walking, climbing stairs and turning over in bed can be difficult or even impossible.

    I am only just about coping with SPD! Still no sign of physio and I've been waiting 4 weeks :cry: I phoned and asked MK hospital when it would be and the rude lady told me I wasn't a priority and I'd just have to wait my turn.... :roll:

    At least I have a bit more of an idea now - thanks for all your info and stories guys - you have helped me loads. Still scares the poop out of me but more prepared now.

    Oh, how long does it take for them to cut ya open to get baby out? And will they take baby away from you even if it's okie or can you hold the baby whilst the stitch you up?
     
  18. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sami

    After spinal block they started the operation at 1.00 and Joshua was out by 1.07. I had a cuddle when they got him out they cut the cord, next time we will insist that DH cuts the cord. They then took him and done all the usual tests AGAR tests (is that right), every baby has them. This took a couple of minutes and then he was passed to Jon and me for a cuddle. I then held him for hours and hours and didnt want to let him go.

    I am sure that i was holding him whilst they were stitching me up.

    xx
     
  19. tracyM

    tracyM Well-Known Member

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    Definately a hospital - they need tea & coffee facilities and ensuite bathrooms in all rooms yet. The bed curtains are all falling down, the windows don't fit or close properly. In winter there's a choice of more blankets on the bed, or more blankets to block the drafts, but it's great!!

    Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction - where your ligaments let your pelvis and hips fall apart. Mine is only only a niggle at the moment, but I know as I get nearer the end, mum and I will be arguing over her mobility scooter and walking frame.

    Sami, have you tried tying your knees together for your SPD. I made mine worse last time because I'm a sod for sitting on the floor cross legged and climbing out of cars like a bloke. Mum told me to tie my knees together, with some padding in between - just remember to unfasten them before going outdoors.

    Tracy xx
     
  20. Tara & Liam

    Tara & Liam Well-Known Member

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    Hi Tracy

    I remember Sami talking about it a while ago and thanks for the last link Sami.

    It sounds really really painful.

    I cant believe after suffering all that pain that you, Sami, are worried about a small needle in your back. The two of you must have a high pain threshold to deal with this condition.

    wishing you all the best

    xx
     

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