At Risk of Redundancy and 7 weeks' pregnant

Discussion in 'First Trimester' started by mistyblue, Jul 18, 2013.

  1. mistyblue

    mistyblue Well-Known Member

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    Hi All,

    Please forgive the length of this post.

    Firstly, after almost a year of trying, I am now seven weeks' pregnant and really excited.

    Today, I was told I was at risk of redundancy, due to a team restructure. They do have a post that they can 'ringfence' for me as my current role matches the new one by 80% or more. I do have to interview for the post and, if I am unsuccessful, will have to go onto the redeployment list to see if they can find me another job in the business for 12 weeks. if I am successful, I will be transferred to the new post by 1st September 2013.

    My boss doesn't yet know I'm pregnant and I'm not sure if I should tell him before or after the interview ( in three weeks). I'm worried that they will find an excuse not to give me the job ( despite it being more or less what I do now) and that I won't be able to find an alternative.

    Also, I am told all my current terms and conditions would remain if I am successful and my service will be recognised as such, so my annual leave, SMP etc should be ok.

    What should I do for the best? Tell my boss in advance of the interview or after? I have read somewhere that there are some additional employment rights for pregnant women, so I might be best to tell him sooner rather than later? Does anyone know? Thanks in advance x x
     
  2. Toria111

    Toria111 Well-Known Member

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    That's a tricky one. It may be worth checking it out with an employment lawyer, or do you know anyone in HR? I've had issues with missing out on a promotion because I told my company I was pregnant. Its against the law, but they found a way around it.
     
  3. mrs_b_x

    mrs_b_x Well-Known Member

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    They can't get rid of you for being pregnant and if you suspected that was the case you'd have one hell of an argument in court. I would feel inclined to wait until afterwards however given your point about your rights I'm not sure now! Will you be able to continue doing your normal job when pregnant? Xx
     
  4. Tarah

    Tarah Well-Known Member

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    You will have more protection now your pregnant . However cause your being interviewed for a new role they can come up with a reason as to why you didn't get the job and unless you could prove otherwise there would be nothing that you could do. I would wait until after the interview to tell them.
     
  5. mistyblue

    mistyblue Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the advice. I have an office based job, so my pregnancy doesn't really affect my ability to do my job. I'm confused as to what to do for the best really. I think I want to do the interview and then tell them, but I feel a bit like I'm misleading them if I don't say something in advance. Also, my organisation has a policy of prioritising finding work in the company for pregnant women at risk of redundancy; however, I don't have to go onto the redeployment list until after the interview anyway... Confused!
     
  6. hayes

    hayes Well-Known Member

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    I wudnt tell them hun, if you can do the job and are the best for the job thats what matters not whether or not your are pg. At least then if you dont get it you wont have to have that was it coz i was pg playing on your mind. Go for it and tell them after. Good luck hun.

    Michelle. x
     
  7. Flo

    Flo Well-Known Member

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    I'm in the same situation, I've been on an apprenticeship which is due to end in august and basically they can get rid of me then. My baby is due December. I've been majorly panicking about it but realised I can't do anything about it. I've already said if they did then it would b seen as discrimination. I work in. Solicitors so they know by law what they can't do and they know I could get them into bother. Thankfully I have a supportive oh and family. I've just got to wait and see what happens I guess. Hope all goes well for you
     
  8. Mummybexee

    Mummybexee Well-Known Member

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    Don't tell them till you either got the job or back awaiting other opportunities

    Whilst your employer can't discriminate - if you have to interview for the job- they can easily say someone else wa better

    I've seen it a lot - and senior managers and HR will rub shoulders to put the business first

    You also have your rights not to tell your employer untill 15 weeks before the baby is
    Due( I think it's 15 weeks) so you have no reason to tell them

    :) chin up - PMA x
     
  9. tetra

    tetra Well-Known Member

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    I would wait until after the interview hun and tell them at 12 weeks. you can't be accused of withholding information as it's common practice to wait until 12 weeks.
    as mummybexee has said, you don't have to disclose to an employer at all until 15 weeks before your due date anyway.

    ultimately though the decision is yours and how good a working relationship you have with your manager and how you think they'll react.

    best of luck whatever you decide xxx
     
  10. ceriannbrown

    ceriannbrown Well-Known Member

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    check when you are legally obligated to tell your employer you are pregnant and tell them at that point. i think it would be horrific if they made any decisions based on you being pregnant. you need the security of maternity leave payment etc. last thing you need this when you're pregnant. i really hope everything works out for you x
     
  11. mistyblue

    mistyblue Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone. Had my booking appointment yesterday and the m/w was of the same opinion. The maternity guidance on our intranet says to inform the manager ' at the earliest convenience' but, as you say, tetra, the common time to tell is 12 weeks, which falls 2 weeks after the interview.

    Many thanks for all you advice. I think I will tell them after my dating scan, when I know everything is ok with the baby x x x
     
  12. Tarah

    Tarah Well-Known Member

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    Hi

    You don't have to legally tell your employer until 15 weeks before you due date. X
     
  13. Bonfire Bride

    Bonfire Bride Well-Known Member

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    This is absolutely correct. My sister in law is the HR Director of a well known company and advised me not to tell a potential new employer (interview was at 24 weeks)

    I hid my bump and went for two roles at the same business - managed to get offered them both and worked for the full contract of 3 months and finished at 38 weeks pregnant with SMP.

    They are not legally allowed to discriminate...but it DOES and WILL happen. Don't worry about your boss...you have to think about yourself and your little baby. Your entitlement to SMP is dictated by your employment history and earnings between certain weeks of your pregnancy.

    It is a dog eat dog world I'm afraid in employment...keep it quiet until you have been successful in your application for the role.

    Good Luck xxx
     
  14. mistyblue

    mistyblue Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all, I will keep quiet :)
     

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