15 month old gone off food

Discussion in 'Baby & Toddler' started by El1en, Aug 28, 2016.

  1. El1en

    El1en Well-Known Member

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    hi everyone

    my LG is nearly 16m. this last week or so she's really gone off her food and I'm a bit worried. until now she's been a fantastic eater. can teething cause this? she's got two of her back teeth coming through son i wondered I'd there was a link.

    she'll eat yoghurt and fruit pouches but not a whole lot more. any suggestions on what should do? she is drinking lots of milk and while she usually has cows milks im giving her a bit formula atm to try and get some more vitamins in
     
  2. tinselcat

    tinselcat Well-Known Member

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    Is she teething perhaps? My son did the same about your age which lasted for 2 or 3 weeks then he resumed eating proper portions. Nursery were a bit worried about him at one stage as he kept refusing anything but he's back to being a good eater once the teeth started coming through.

    Edit: just saw you asked if it was teething, so yes it definitely could be :)
     
    #2 tinselcat, Aug 28, 2016
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2016
  3. kumber

    kumber Well-Known Member

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    Sounds teething related to me but could also just be a phase. My two go through phases of not wanting to eat and then shovelling it down them the rest of the time. They're great at regulating themselves so if you find she's not eating and she's generally happy then she may not have much of an appetite. I'm sure it'll come back fairly quickly though! :)


     
  4. BunnyN

    BunnyN Well-Known Member

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    It does sound like it could be teething. I think they get to an age where they dont need to be eating loads all the time too, then it depends on growth spurts ect. My two loved solids and ate everything they could get their hands on until about 14 months old then they got a bit more picky. On the whole they still eat well but they go phases and have more opinion about what they will eat. DS hates cows milk but DD lives on it. She has times when she drinks loads of milk and wont eat much for two or three days (often when she isnt feeling well)and then she will eat loads for a couple of days. I could limit he milk but kind of recon as long as I'm not giving her a load of junk food and offering her plenty of healthy options her body will work out for itself what it needs.
     
  5. JD.Deedee

    JD.Deedee Well-Known Member

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    Yes. My son would go off food every single time his teeth would bother him and then ones at the back are far worse than the front ones. But my lad would through up like the little exorcist... During my preg I threw up so much I knew how awful it was chucking up food so I knew why he wouldn't eat besides it hurting his gums. If it's just the gums see if teething gel/granules or ibuprofen will help x

    We had the proper fussy phase which start at 2 year and 4 months and lasted for about half a year. I didn't bother to much and just made sure he was fed rather than making a fuss. He eats everything and more that he did before that phase.

    If you're on cows milk, you could get vitamin drops to make sure there's enough vitamin intake during fussy periods x


     
  6. El1en

    El1en Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the replies girls, I'm glad (kinf of) that teething can cause a loss of appetite. I definitely think that's what it is. she's eaten more todaybut I can tell her gums arent bothering her as much today to. thanks again
     

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